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THE DAILY ROADHOUSE

 

Cassini Resources Discovers New Mineralised Prospect at Yarawindah

THE DRILL SERGEANT: Cassini Resources (ASX: CZI) has been encouraged by early drilling results from the company’s 80 per cent-owned Yarawindah Brook project located northeast of Perth near New Norcia in Western Australia.

Saturn Metals Drills Major Step Out Result at Apollo Hill

THE DRILL SERGEANT: Saturn Metals (ASX: STN) released results from a Reverse Circulation (RC) drilling campaign undertaken at the company’s 100 per cent-owned Apollo Hill gold project in Western Australia.

Lithium Australia Patent Applications Published by WIPO

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia has had two patent applications published by The International Bureau of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

Impact Minerals Identifies Porphyry Copper-Gold Prospects

THE DRILL SERGEANT: Impact Minerals (ASX: IPT) has identified four undrilled priority prospects for porphyry copper-gold deposits at the company’s 100 per cent-owned Commonwealth project in the copper-gold Lachlan Fold Belt in New South Wales.

 

Lithium Australia Patent Applications Published by WIPO

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia has had two patent applications published by The International Bureau of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

The Lithium Australia patent applications are for the recovery of lithium phosphate from lithium-bearing silicates and solutions.

The company explained that publication is an important step towards obtaining a patent grant, which provides legal protection in international jurisdictions.

Production of lithium phosphate is a unit process common to Lithium Australia’s SiLeach® and LieNA® technologies, which potentially reduce the number of processing steps to produce battery cathode powders.

“The company has succeeded in developing technologies that improve the sustainability of, and reduce the environmental impacts associated with, the manufacture, use and disposal of lithium-ion batteries,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said in the company’s announcement to the Australian Securities Exchange.

“Importantly, these technologies can facilitate vertical integration within the battery supply chain, potentially reducing the number of process steps involved and lowering costs for consumers.

“The ability to integrate metal recovery from lithium-ion batteries and regenerate cathode materials represents a major advance for the battery industry as a whole.”

Lithium Australia has developed innovative processes for the recovery of lithium chemicals from lithium-bearing silicates and micas.

The company’s efforts have resulted in unit process enhancements that optimise the recovery of lithium from lowtenor solutions, while managing water-balance challenges, to produce lithium phosphate of a high quality.

The unit processes involved are the subject of the above-mentioned patent applications.

Lithium phosphate produced by way of the company’s proprietary processes meets the specification necessary for its use as feedstock in the production of lithium-ferrophosphate (LFP), a cathode precursor material in the manufacture of batteries for energy-storage system and transport applications.

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com

Web: www.lithium-au.com

 

Lithium Australia

THE CONFERENCE CALLER: Pyrometallurgical processing of spent Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) can efficiently recover nickel, copper, cobalt and manganese from LIBs, but not the lithium or graphite.

Research and development into the science by Western Australia-based battery recycling company, Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) recognised that a potential alternative to the downsides associated with pyrometallurgical processing is to take a hydrometallurgical approach.

LIBs enable us to cope with the technological demands of modern living, such as maintaining a charge on our mobile phones or computer-related devices, thus keeping us contacted with the rest of the world and our family members in the next room.

They are, presently, our greatest source of portable power yet are, ironically, creating an environmental nightmare.

On a global basis only around nine per cent of spent LIBs are recycled to keep them out of landfill and recover valuable metals.

In Australia, which is supposedly one of the recycling powerhouses, the recycling rate is embarrassing, some would say woeful, coming in at less than three per cent.

What this all means is that the world is missing out on a great opportunity – that being the large quantity of batteries discarded globally which actually represents a potentially significant resource.

Australia is a long way behind the countries that are presently leading the battery recycling wars.

Belgium, South Korea, China and Canada recycle the most batteries, with the metals they contain generally recovered by smelting – or as it is referred to by those in the know – pyrometallurgical processing.

Lithium Australia is developing a hydrometallurgical technique that recovers all metals, including lithium, from spent LIBs.

Lithium Australia has openly declared that its corporate intentions include shoring up an ethical and sustainable supply of energy metals to the battery industry, thus enhancing energy security in the process.

The company is eager to create a circular battery economy and has highlighted the recycling of old lithium-ion batteries to new, is intrinsic to this plan.

In October 2019, Lithium Australia announced it had increased its equity in Envirostream Australia Pty Ltd (EA) to 23.9 per cent.

Envirostream is the only company in Australia with the integrated capacity to collect, sort, shred and separate all the components of spent LIBs.

In December, Lithium Australia completed a JV for joint battery marketing operations with China-based battery and energy storage specialists the DLG Group (DLG).

The JV will trade as Soluna Australia Pty Ltd, and will sell lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and Soluna energy storage products into the rapidly expanding Australian renewables energy market.

Lithium Australia’s 100 per cent-owned subsidiary company, VSPC Ltd has developed advanced processes for manufacturing lithium-ferro-phosphate (LFP) cathode powders at its R&D and pilot plant facility in Brisbane, Queensland.

The cathode powders produced by VSPC possess simple nanotechnology that produces superior battery cathodes, provides control of composition and particle size in a precise manner and highly reliable quality control with low production costs.

VSPC Ltd signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Beijing Saideli Technology Incorporated Company Ltd (SDL) to commercialise VSPC cathode material.

The terms of the MoU include the low-capital establishment of a supply chain for VSPC cathode material in China, and collaboration on a feasibility study for an international cathode material project, beyond China, using VSPC technology.

The MoU was agreed following technical review and discussions based on VSPC’s Lithium-Ferro-Phosphate (LFP) cathode product.

VSPC is a developer of advanced cathode materials that owns a patented process for the production of lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode materials.

SDL’s experience lies in the design and manufacture of process equipment and extensive experience in the construction, commissioning and operation of chemical process plants, including those for the production of LIB cathode powders.

The market for LFP cathode material is anticipated to enjoy a strong run in the near future with analysts forecasting to grow strongly over the next decade.

In addition to core applications for ebus and stationary storage, heightened demand is expected through substitution (existing) and displacement (expanding) in applications that have traditionally been the domain of lead acid batteries.

This includes, but is not limited to, 12V and 48V applications for micro and mild hybrid powertrains, LSEV (low speed electric vehicles), datacentre UPS and 5G tower backup.

“We see partnering with SDL – which has a demonstrated track record in process development and high-tech process plant delivery – as a great opportunity,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said.

“VSPC’s MoU with SDL provides Lithium Australia with a low-capital pathway to the commercialisation of VSPC cathode powders, in order to meet targets set by our other partners in China.”

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com
Web: www.lithium-au.com
Directors: Adrian Griffin, Bryan Dixon, George Bauk

 

Lithium Australia Subsidiary Signs Cathode Technology MoU with Chinese Conglomerate

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia’s (ASX: LIT) wholly-owned subsidiary company VSPC Ltd, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Beijing Saideli Technology Incorporated Company Ltd (SDL) to commercialise VSPC cathode material.

The terms of the MoU include the low-capital establishment of a supply chain for VSPC cathode material in China, and collaboration on a feasibility study for an international cathode material project, beyond China, using VSPC technology.

The MoU was agreed following technical review and discussions based on VSPC’s Lithium-Ferro-Phosphate (LFP) cathode product.

VSPC is a developer of advanced cathode materials that owns a patented process for the production of lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode materials.

SDL’s experience lies in the design and manufacture of process equipment and extensive experience in the construction, commissioning and operation of chemical process plants, including those for the production of LIB cathode powders.

The market for LFP cathode material is anticipated to enjoy a strong run in the near future with analysts forecasting to grow strongly over the next decade.

In addition to core applications for ebus and stationary storage, heightened demand is expected through substitution (existing) and displacement (expanding) in applications that have traditionally been the domain of lead acid batteries.

This includes, but is not limited to, 12V and 48V applications for micro and mild hybrid powertrains, LSEV (low speed electric vehicles), datacentre UPS and 5G tower backup.

“We see partnering with SDL – which has a demonstrated track record in process development and high-tech process plant delivery – as a great opportunity,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said in the company’s announcement to the Australian Securities Exchange.

“VSPC’s MoU with SDL provides Lithium Australia with a low-capital pathway to the commercialisation of VSPC cathode powders, in order to meet targets set by our other partners in China.

“We look forward to working with SDL, with a specific focus on the anticipated growth of LFP cathode materials for transport and energy-storage applications.”

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com

Web: www.lithium-au.com

 

 

Lithium Australia Completes Energy Storage JV

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) announced the completion of its Joint Venture for joint battery marketing operations with China-based battery and energy storage specialists the DLG Group (DLG).

Lithium Australia said the new enterprise will be an incorporated JV venture with it holding 50 per cent interest and DLG the same.

The JV will be trading as Soluna Australia Pty Ltd, which has been established to sell lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and Soluna energy storage products into the rapidly expanding Australian renewables energy market.

Lithium Australia cited a detailed investigation of the Australian energy-storage industry that identified there to be serious supply-chain constraints in the delivery of LIBs to Australian customers.

The company indicated that Soluna Australia intends to provide a new and reliable supply source for renewable energy solutions to power users in Australia.

The Australian renewable energy sector is presently experiencing strong growth, which has led the Australian Council of Learned Academics to estimate that 16 Gigawatt hours of energy storage will be required by 2030 to ensure security of electricity supply for the medium forecast rate of uptake of renewable energy.

That is estimated to necessitate investment of more than $5 billion in energy-storage solutions in the next 10 years, with LIBs forming a large proportion.

Under the Lithium Australia/DLG agreement, the parties will facilitate technological cooperation between LIT Subsidiary, VSPC Ltd and DLG for both cathode and battery R&D.

DLG will work with Lithium Australia to further develop VSPC’s cathode powders, initially with a focus on lithium-ferro-phosphate (LFP) LIBs, LFP being the ideal battery chemistry for Australian energy-storage applications.

DLG has been working with VSPC to test LFP cathode powders produced at the latter’s pilot plant in Brisbane, Australia.

Those powders have been used in the manufacture of commercial 18650 LIBs at DLG’s Shanghai R&D facility.

“Formalisation of Lithium Australia’s Joint Venture with DLG, which resulted in the creation of Soluna Australia, paves the way for the introduction of superior energy-storage products into the Australian market, reducing the carbon footprint of national energy consumption for both residential and industrial consumers,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said in the company’s announcement to the Australian Securities Exchange.

“We foresee great potential for energy storage in fringe-of-grid and off-grid applications, as well as improvements in the utilisation of power from existing grids.”

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com

 

Web: www.lithium-au.com

Lithium Australia Finalises Energy Storage JV

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) announced the completion of its Joint Venture for joint battery marketing operations with China-based battery and energy storage specialists the DLG Group (DLG).

Lithium Australia said the new enterprise will be an incorporated JV venture with it holding 50 per cent interest and DLG the same.

The JV will be trading as Soluna Australia Pty Ltd, which has been established to sell lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and Soluna energy storage products into the rapidly expanding Australian renewables energy market.

Lithium Australia cited a detailed investigation of the Australian energy-storage industry that identified there to be serious supply-chain constraints in the delivery of LIBs to Australian customers.

The company indicated that Soluna Australia intends to provide a new and reliable supply source for renewable energy solutions to power users in Australia.

The Australian renewable energy sector is presently experiencing strong growth, which has led the Australian Council of Learned Academics to estimate that 16 Gigawatt hours of energy storage will be required by 2030 to ensure security of electricity supply for the medium forecast rate of uptake of renewable energy.

That is estimated to necessitate investment of more than $5 billion in energy-storage solutions in the next 10 years, with LIBs forming a large proportion.

Under the Lithium Australia/DLG agreement, the parties will facilitate technological cooperation between LIT Subsidiary, VSPC Ltd and DLG for both cathode and battery R&D.

DLG will work with Lithium Australia to further develop VSPC’s cathode powders, initially with a focus on lithium-ferro-phosphate (LFP) LIBs, LFP being the ideal battery chemistry for Australian energy-storage applications.

DLG has been working with VSPC to test LFP cathode powders produced at the latter’s pilot plant in Brisbane, Australia.

Those powders have been used in the manufacture of commercial 18650 LIBs at DLG’s Shanghai R&D facility.

“Formalisation of Lithium Australia’s Joint Venture with DLG, which resulted in the creation of Soluna Australia, paves the way for the introduction of superior energy-storage products into the Australian market, reducing the carbon footprint of national energy consumption for both residential and industrial consumers,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said in the company’s announcement to the Australian Securities Exchange.

“We foresee great potential for energy storage in fringe-of-grid and off-grid applications, as well as improvements in the utilisation of power from existing grids.”

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com

 

Web: www.lithium-au.com

 

Lithium Australia and Neometals Leading the Australian LIB Recycling Pack

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: There is little doubt that the world is currently in the thrall of the lithium-ion battery (LIB).

They help us survive the modern struggles that we encounter on a daily basis, such as maintaining a charge on our mobile phones or computer-related devices, thus keeping us contacted with the rest of the world and our family members in the next room.

They are, presently, our greatest source of portable power.

They are also, ironically, creating an environmental nightmare.

Analysts who like to make themselves important have made some big predictions in recent years, especially in regard to the market penetration of LIBs, particularly in the electric vehicle (EV) sector.

Through all the noise in this space, it has generally filtered through that it is likely that the availability of spent batteries will rise to more than seven million tonnes annually over the next 20 years.

Diligently, we sort our household rubbish each week, or fortnight, depending on the generosity of your local council, into different levels of importance, filling any number of bins to assuage our collective waste related guilt.

On a global basis, however, only around nine per cent of spent LIBs are recycled to keep them out of landfill and recover valuable metals.

In Australia, which is supposedly one of the recycling powerhouses, the recycling rate is embarrassing, some would say woeful, coming in at less than three per cent.

What this all means is that the world is missing out on a great opportunity – that being the large quantity of batteries discarded globally actually represents a potentially significant resource.

Australia is a long way behind the countries that are presently leading the battery recycling wars.

Belgium, South Korea, China and Canada recycle the most batteries, with the metals they contain generally recovered by smelting – or as it is referred to by those in the know – pyrometallurgical processing.

Pyrometallurgical processing of spent LIBs can efficiently recover nickel, copper, cobalt and manganese from LIBs, but not the lithium or graphite.

Research and development into the science by Western Australia-based battery recycling company, Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) realised that a potential alternative to the downsides associated with pyrometallurgical processing is to take a hydrometallurgical approach.

Lithium Australia is developing a hydrometallurgical technique that recovers all metals, including lithium, from spent LIBs.

Lithium Australia has openly declared that its corporate intentions include shoring up an ethical and sustainable supply of energy metals to the battery industry, thus enhancing energy security in the process.

The company is eager to create a circular battery economy and has highlighted the recycling of old lithium-ion batteries to new is intrinsic to this plan.

In October 2019, Lithium Australia announced it had increased its equity in Envirostream Australia Pty Ltd (EA) to 23.9 per cent.

Envirostream is the only company in Australia with the integrated capacity to collect, sort, shred and separate all the components of spent LIBs.

Another string to Lithium Australia’s LIB bow is it 100 per cent-owned subsidiary company, VSPC Ltd that has developed advanced processes for manufacturing lithium-ferro-phosphate (LFP) cathode powders at its R&D and pilot plant facility in Brisbane, Queensland.

The cathode powders produced by VSPC possess simple nanotechnology that produces superior battery cathodes, provides control of composition and particle size in a precise manner and highly reliable quality control with low production costs.

Recent evaluation of VSPC’s Gen 4 LFP cathode material was undertaken at Chinese battery producer DLG Battery Co., Ltd. That saw the materials assessed in a commercial 18650 battery-cell format under a range of electrochemical and temperature conditions and subjected to long-term cycle testing.

The testing concluded that VSPC’s LFP material met DLG’s stringent specifications for use in LIB cells for both power and energy applications.

VSPC also received positive feedback from Japanese battery-cell producers, which are evaluating its LFP products at laboratory scale with the electrochemical performance of VSPC’s LFP material meeting the rigorous Japanese requirements.

“This year has seen a significant shift in the Chinese battery markets, with greater demand for LFP for use in short-range electric vehicle and energy-storage applications,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said.

“The test results from battery producers in China and Japan show clearly that the performance of VSPC cathode powders is comparable to other materials currently supplied for the production of LFP LIBs.

“We look forward to furthering our partnerships within the battery industry and, ultimately, supplying products that meet not only VSPC’s stringent quality specifications but those of its international customers.”

Lithium Australia anticipates the market for LFP to grow strongly in the next 10 years, due to its particular suitability for energy storage and certain types of transportation, which includes being a replacement for lead-acid batteries in various automotive applications and as back-up for power supplies.

Another Western Australian company that was an early battery recycling proponent is Neometals (ASX: NMT).

Neometals has been also carrying out LIB Pilot test-work, however its focus is the recovery of very high-purity (+99.9%) nickel-sulphate solution from the hydrometallurgical processing stage of its patent pending recycling technology.

The latest tests produced nickel recovery from shredded battery feed into nickel product that exceeded 98 per cent.

The Pilot test-work being is being undertaken on behalf of Neometals by SGS Canada Inc.

The work represents part of the pre-development activities for a proposed commercial LIB recycling venture targeting greater than 90 per cent recovery of LIB materials from electric vehicle and consumer electronics production scrap and end-of-life cells.

Neometals shredded and processed 2.3 tonnes of spent commercial LIBs during the initial Feed Preparation Stage of the Pilot test-work.

A total of 980 kilograms of mixed cathode and anode materials, known as Black Powder, fed the subsequent hydrometallurgical processing stage, from which chemical products are recovered and refined into high-purity cathode intermediate materials.

The Hydrometallurgical Processing stage leaches the Black Powder and sequentially recovers cathode materials, which are refined to generate high-purity chemical products for potential sale directly into the battery supply chain.

As the Pilot test-work program draws towards completion, it does so having recovered a suite of materials, including copper, manganese, cobalt and nickel-sulphates.

“The Pilot test-work continues to deliver very encouraging results that support the Neometals desire to sell high-purity cathode materials back into the battery supply chain,” Neometals managing director Chris Reed said.

“With provenance, ethical supply and material scarcity concerns, a sustainable, secure supply chain will be key for leaders in energy storage.

“Eco-friendly recycling will play that vital role and our development timing aligns well with global forecast cell capacity against the projected supply deficit in traditional mine-sourced battery minerals.”

Neometals said the purity and the recovery rates of the nickel product materially had exceeded its expectations, enabling it to tick off another milestone in the confirmation of the technical feasibility of the company’s proprietary process.

The company explained that the recovery of cobalt and nickel are key drivers of the project economics adding that the Pilot purity/recovery data strongly supports the validity of previous economic evaluations.

Neometals expects to hit its remains on schedule for completing the bulk of the Pilot stage by December 2019.

It is also expected that the recovery of lithium will be due to commence prior to year-end and be concluded in January 2020 along with outcomes from final purification and crystallisation to produce ultra-high purity, cathode materials.

Successful completion of the Pilot and confirmation of the mass-energy balances are the key technical considerations for SMS Group’s due diligence for a 50:50 joint venture decision.

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com
info@neometals.com.au

 

Web: www.lithium-au.com
www.neometals.com.au

 

THE DAILY ROADHOUSE

 

Altech Chemicals Explains High Purity Alumina Use in Semi-Conductor Applications

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Sometimes a company announcement comes along that needs to be brought to the attention of punters, simply due to the information it presents.

Lithium Australia Takes Larger Stake in Battery Recycler Envirostream

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) has made further inroads in its quest to ensure an ethical and sustainable supply of energy metals to the battery industry as well as enhancing energy security in the process, by creating a circular battery economy.

Venture Minerals Moves Riley Mine Towards Production

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Venture Minerals (ASX: VMS) provided an update on the progress of construction activities at the company’s Riley iron ore mine in Tasmania.

Altech Chemicals, Lithium Australia and Venture Minerals are all presenting at the upcoming New World Metals Conference.

Azure Minerals Completes Strategic Mexican Land Acquisition

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Azure Minerals (ASX: AZS) has completed the acquisition of the Sara Alicia II mineral concession that adjoins the company’s 100 per cent-owned Sara Alicia property in the northern Mexican state of Sonora.

Lithium Australia Takes Larger Stake in Battery Recycler Envirostream

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) has made further inroads in its quest to ensure an ethical and sustainable supply of energy metals to the battery industry as well as enhancing energy security in the process, by creating a circular battery economy.

The recycling of old lithium-ion batteries to new is intrinsic to this plan and Lithium Australia announced the achievement of a key milestone in its circular battery economy plans by confirming an increase in the company’s stake in leading Australian battery recycler Envirostream from 23.9 per cent to 73.7 per cent.

Envirostream recently signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with South Korean company SungEel HiTech Co., Ltd for the sale of recycled battery metals that covers the exclusive supply of metals extracted from recycled lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) out of Australia.

That supply comprises mixed metal dust (MMD) that contains the energy metals cobalt, nickel and lithium that are recovered from spent LIBs at Envirostream’s battery recycling plant in Melbourne.

Envirostream is the only company in Australia with the integrated capacity to collect, sort, shred and separate all the components of spent LIBs, making it a perfect fit with Lithium Australia’s critical battery metal extraction expertise.

During FY19, Envirostream generated $1.3 million in revenue from recycling 149 tonnes of spent batteries.

The expanded plant, which has the capacity to recycle up to 3,000 tonnes per annum of batteries, has been successfully commissioned with first MMD produced.

It is currently in the process of being ramped up and optimised.

“Lithium Australia views the acquisition of a controlling interest in Envirostream as not only taking a key position in the recycling of battery metals, but also providing an environmental solution for all Australians that use batteries,” Lithium Australia managing director Adrian Griffin said in the company’s announcement to the Australian Securities Exchange.

“Following the successful construction and commissioning of Australia’s biggest lithium ion battery recycling plant, Envirostream can now focus on the roll out of its Australia-wide collection network.

“Together, Lithium Australia and Envirostream are developing environmentally responsible solutions to the mounting problems of spent batteries.

“Keeping spent batteries from landfill and exporting the energy metals they contain is an Australian imperative.

“Closing the loop on the production of battery materials reduces the environmental footprint of the mining and processing aspects inherent in battery production, improves sustainability and prevents the components of spent batteries from leaking into groundwater and oceans as a consequence of their relegation to landfill or transport to other jurisdictions.

“Envirostream can provide an immediate and viable solution to the LIB disposal crisis in this country.”

As part consideration for the acquired interest Lithium Australia has made a payment to Envirostream of $100,000, a percentage of which will be used by Envirostream for commissioning its expanded Melbourne battery recycling facilities.

Following the acquisition of LIT’s 73.7 pwer cent interest in Envirostream, the company’s founder Andrew Mackenzie will remain as managing director while Adrian Griffin will be appointed non-executive chairman and Andrew Skalski will be appointed as a non-executive director.

 

Email: info@lithium-au.com

Web: www.lithium-au.com

 

THE DAILY ROADHOUSE

 

Mincor Resources Enhances Cassini Mineral Resource

THE DRILL SERGEANT: Mincor Resources (ASX: MCR) released a healthy increase in the Mineral Resource for the company’s Cassini nickel sulphide deposit at Kambalda in Western Australia.

Lithium Australia Subsidiary Confirms Offtake Deal with Korean Battery Recycler

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Lithium Australia (ASX: LIT) announced its 24 per cent subsidiary Envirostream Australia Pty Ltd signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with South Korean company SungEel HiTech Co., Ltd for the sale of recycled battery metals.

Meteoric Resources Extends Juruena and Claims Porphyry Style Gold‐Copper Discovery

THE DRILL SERGEANT: Meteoric Resources (ASX: MEI) received the latest assays from drill holes JUDD009 and JUDD010 that were completed during the maiden drill program at the company’s 100 per cent-owned Juruena gold project in Brazil.

Gateway Mining to Divest Non-Core Edjudina Exploration Project

THE BOURSE WHISPERER: Gateway Mining (ASX: GML) has entered into a tenement sale agreement for the sale of the company’s Edjudina project Exploration Licences in the Laverton Region of Western Australia.